Quaker Meeting Houses Always Popular with Photographers

In the 1890s and early 1900s, Oxford Tribune editor, Douglas Brinton, took many photographs of the Brick Meetinghouse and other sites in the Calvert village area. Brinton’s original glass plate negatives are now held by the Chester County Historical Society. These images, from the 1890s, show the Brick meetinghouse before the new roof, which rejuvenated its appearance before the 1901 Bicentennial Celebration.

In this photograph by Brinton, the meetinghouse is all spruced up for the 1901 celebrations! Notice the difference in the roof line between these photographs and those above.
In this photograph by Brinton, the meetinghouse is all spruced up for the 1901 celebrations! Notice the difference in the roof line between these photographs and those above.

Will Chambers, a photographer from Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, is credited with these scenes of the Brick Meetinghouse. These may have been taken during the 1901 Bicentennial Celebration.

Annapolis photographer Marion E. Warren, shown here photographing the Cumberland Gap in Western Maryland
Annapolis photographer Marion E. Warren, shown here photographing the Cumberland Gap in Western Maryland.

Annapolis photographer Marion E. Warren, documented the condition of Brick Meetinghouse in the early 1960s, before an extensive restoration project was begun. Photographer Marion Edwin Warren was born near Billings, Montana on June 18, 1920. Marion became fascinated with photography during his junior year at Ben Blewitt High School. He purchased his first camera, an Argus, for $12.50, and became the yearbook photographer. After graduation, the company that produced his yearbook hired him as a gofer. The job was temporary, but it gave him an inside view of the career he wished to enter. He eventually became the photographer for the State of Maryland’s Department of Information. The Marion E. Warren Collection, with its original photographs by Marion and large number of copy photographs of vintage prints and negatives, forms the backbone of the photographic collections at the Maryland State Archives.